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Posts Tagged ‘Raiding’

It’s been a good few days…  I seem to have the luck this weekend!

Friday night we did a bunch of Molten Core runs to try and get me the Harbinger of Flame pet from the Sulfuron Harbinger.  Venoym’s alt went in and got it, after about 10 of my toons had gone through with no luck.

Saturday morning, before leaving for the day, I finished the apprentice questline and got “I am the Master Now”.  Saturday night we did LFR and I got the item I’ve been wanting for weeks… the sword off Elegon.  I still need to get the Sha Touched Weapon, but that’ll come eventually [I hope].

Because I got the weapon, I got Mystically Epic

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Mystically Epic!

Now there are only a couple things I need in LFR.

On a whim, I got into the bidding war for the Blood Soaked Invitations and to my shock, won one.  It’s going to put off getting my first JC mount for about a month [based on personal gold totals I want to maintain] but I felt like it was worth it and I joined BigBearButt in fighting and cheering on the competitiors.  I made Rank 4 in the Brawler’s guild today :D.  Rank 7 is going to take a LOT of work… and figuring out how to dps as a frost death knight.

Oh, as Bear says in his post, Venoym and I have joined his guild, along with a few friends of ours.

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I retrieve my invitation, in total shock. The Orc there cheered at me when I got the achievement!

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Bear cheers me on while I fight a bad guy!

This afternoon, while Ven, LittleVen and a friend were grilling burgers and hot dogs, I saw an advertisement for a Darkmoon Rabbit raid, which I almost passed on as it was almost lunch time.  I’m sure glad I didn’t.

I WON IT!  Darkmoon Rabbit!

I WON IT! Darkmoon Rabbit!

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My main’s doing quite well at this point in the expansion.  I’m exalted with all the reps except Shadopan [16k/21k] and August Celestials [9k/21k].  I’ve maxed out every profession at least once, so I have access to them all on my main server.  I’ve gotten two alts to 90 – including my horde alt on another server [yay achievements!]

I’ve killed Heroic Nefarian, finished the “Glorious” achievement of killing the rares, managed Galleon kills two times [got nothing], am best friends with everyone on the farm and even have my second alt to 90 exalted with the tillers [and all I did on her was login, replant her farm and do the tiller dailies in 15 mins or so].  I’ve done a couple Firelands retro runs, and even killed the first boss of Mogushun Vaults with whomever we could pull together in guild and a couple out of guild friends.  We also got the second boss to 26%.

Pet Battles have been what’s fallen to the wayside.  I know they’ve captured most people’s attention instead of all the other but for me it’s been the reverse.  I really want to do more for that in the coming few weeks as I’d like to get the upper level pets and I’d be ready for 5.1.  It just… well the grind to get a level 25 pet seems so painful looking.  My highest level pet is 10 right now.

I would post some screen shots, but at the moment I am without my computer :(  The hard drive died and since I have the laptop [and access to Venoym’s computer during the day], we decided it would be easier just to wait till the weekend to swap some drives about.  So, when he can move the data over, I will have some screenies, though I have posted a few things on twitpic.

National Novel Writing Month is this month and I have written a bit thus far…  I’m still not sure I’m participating.  I’ve already written 125k this year [my goal was 100k, but I revised that and raised it to 150k] so I’m not sure I want to push myself to cram another 50k in but I’m writing daily as is…  I may just see what happens.

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We killed 8/8 tonight in 3 hours!  WOOT!  What a Valentine’s present to ourselves!

Group Makeup:
Tanks: Paladin/Death Knight
Healers: Paladin/Druid/Holy Priest
DPS: Paladin/Rogue/Hunter/Mage/Priest

 

Gratz guys and fantastic job!  Go Firestorm!

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Here are some tips for making your LFR experience more pleasing and less designed to make you tear your hair out.  My hubby and I have run LFR every week since it came out, both parts [minus the week the second part wasn’t available] and occasionally on multiple toons on random days.  We have yet to leave an LFR raid for “being fail” but we by being us have eliminated several of the most potentially devastating problems [and yes, all of our raids have been completed in a timely manner].

1. If you can lead, DO.  Hubby and I have commented to each other more than once that a halfway decent raid leader can probably pull an average group through the first 7 bosses with minimal wipes.  There is the small issue of “human errors” and true “bads” [bads here being defined as people intentionally causing problems via malice, not through ignorance].

2. If someone else can lead, don’t be afraid to let them.  Don’t need to lead so badly that you can’t let someone else bear the burden.  An epeen war of the raid leading variety can be epicly nasty.

3. Give directions.  Don’t just tell people “don’t fail”.    Yes, I agree that everyone should read up on the fights in advance, but I’d rather give a five second explanation than spend 5-10 minutes wiping and running back.

3a. Simplify, simplify, simplify.  Don’t try to get into lengthy boss explanations.  In LFR as it stands, healers really don’t need much instruction on most fights.  Whisper tanking instructions to the tanks if they don’t know the fights.  Keep directions to dps in raid very simple.  For example, on Ultraxion “Stack, hit button when Hour of Twilight comes”.

3b. There will always be griefers and people intentionally causing issues or people who refuse to listen.  In LFR there is enough leeway on most fights to either heal through the problem [And I have healed in LFR so I know how annoying that is], or to just let them die.  Most people don’t care to be dead for most of the fight, so they may learn through repetition.

4. Controlling the tanking seems to lend itself to an easy raid, and I don’t mean being controlling of random tanks.  If you can supply your own tanks, who know how to do their job, it will lend itself to a smoother raid [adding a couple of healers in there wouldn’t be amiss either… and some powerhouse dps never hurt – just sayin’].  Tanking the LFR may not be particularly complex, but a bad tank can mean much bigger problems than a poor healer or a low dps.

5. If someone is being obviously problematic, ask in raid for a kick.  We got kicks for a couple of AFK people and a blood dps dk in full pvp gear, in blood presence, griefing the raid.  [Psychic drain on the whole raid because of a taunt = bad].  You don’t have to be particularly mean about asking either.  “Please kick Arthasdklol for being AFK”.

6. There’s really no need to heckle people.  If dps is too low, as kindly as possible point out that those below the tank or below a particular threshold need to up their game for future encounters.  Many times people in that category will step it up or bow out, without the need of name calling and shaming [I would do that on any alt that fell into that category].  Perhaps they thought they would be fine or would do better than they are… perhaps they are simply out of practice.  Who knows?  If they won’t and are particularly problematic [ie doing nothing or doing 2k or something], ask for a kick.

7. Do YOUR best.  Don’t go in and AFK constantly or only move when a boss fight is going on, or ignore mechanics and raid calls.  Nothing is more annoying than a leech.  Life does happen and if you need to AFK just say something like “AFK just a moment, I’ll be right back”.  You can give a reason or not.  They may read it or not but by that notice you’ve done your due diligence in terms of that [barring emergencies – RL does take precedence of course].  Don’t nerdrage over loot, and don’t let yourself be bothered if someone else does.  If they’re harrassing you, put them on ignore.  In other words, all the common sense stuff.

LFR requires a measure of patience to complete and frankly, probably always will.  Keep in mind that this was designed for those who don’t or cannot raid, not for hardcore or even necessarily the casual raider [who can also benefit from it].

For some people this could even be their first experience with raiding, so the mild amount of encounter training will only ease the frustration of the LFR.  Imagine if they learn and pay that forward, and so on… it might even feed back into a more pleasant LFR for you down the line.

All this said, if you can’t handle patience – don’t queue, or if you reach your limit, leave.  It’s not worth sacrificing your sanity for the 250 valor that can easily be attained in 3 HoT randoms.

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It’s always been amazing to me that the simple fact that my husband and I want to raid together is always taken as a sign that one of us [usually me] doesn’t deserve to be there.  I’ll fully concede that having space for two tanks is not always possible.  And we’ve paid our dues before and sat out together plenty of times.

For years, World of Warcraft has been our thing together.  It’s what we do and what we enjoy.  At first that didn’t include raiding but it eventually evolved to that point.  And the reality is that raiding without my husband is ridiculous.  It’s asking us both to give up our evening together [which is our time together].  And while I don’t mind one of us filling in every once in a while, I truly resent someone telling us that we’re going to raid separately and like it or else.

The other assumption that we get is that we’re demanding to go on every raid.  We don’t. We’ve been truthful in being up front with guilds we’ve joined about what we want and what we expect. If they can’t give us what we’re looking for, we’re quite happy to look elsewhere.

In truth, we didn’t expect to be in progression with our new guild. Being the new kids on the block and both being tanks didn’t exactly put us in the number one choice spot, but we’d been given the alt run to co-tank and do with as we pleased. They didn’t have tanks for it or a raid leader to organize it and we could provide both those things. Circumstance happened and we ended up co-tanking the progression run and bringing a pair of alts to the alt group.

I’ve dealt with rostering couples before and while not easy, it can be quite rewarding if you’re able to get it done. You get two people moving in sync and that can be a pretty powerful advantage to the raid [one of my previous ten mans had 3 couples working togther and we could be an impressive crew if I do say so myself]. The underlying assumption we’ve always worked with is that both people in the couple will do their best to maximize and continue to earn their keep, as it were. That’s how we did it in our previous guild… if one wasn’t qualified and they wanted to raid together – they’d both get sat and told why.

As for ourselves, we’ve always taken running as a couple as challenge to do better and better. We both need to deserve it and, not to be conceited – we both do. Back in Burning Crusade when I was a lock [hubby was still a paladin], we actually raided very little, because they seldom had a spot for the two of us. It was all good – truly.

I’ve been asked before how I can stand to co-tank with my hubby… that fulfilling the same role as their S/O drives them batty… Well the reality is that it’s quite easy for us. Being co-tanks and having been co-tanks since Naxxramas days, we’re incredibly in sync with each other. Our raid and guild leading experience only enhanced that connection. You could even say that we push each other to become better tanks. It also doesn’t hurt that hubby is the one who taught me how to tank. Yes, I learned to tank as a death knight from a paladin. [I learned the specifics of dk tanking on my own of course].

A lot of the “most annoying” or “most challenging” aspects of tanking are gone – out the window with a tank couple. Tank swaps? Not a problem. No ego to worry about on the other tank who might not be willing to share aggro. Sudden tank death? Not an issue. Hubby goofed one week and fell off Beth’s web. I hop up to manage Beth between drones while they battle rez him – just in time for him to pick up the next drone. Perfect complementing each other, magical timing, anticipating the other’s moves… And it actually feels that good. :) We don’t have to mark on trash, we know who’s going to pull what, when and have known for quite some time. We each have fights and areas we excel at – and one class might be better than another on some fights. We try and optimize that where we can.

Our rhythm is so good and so second nature in fact, that on our first run with the new guild we had to throttle it back… actually make some of the calls on vent and let them get a feel for how we work.

The most common question we get, to our amusement is who the main tank is. We actually don’t have one between us. When we started in Naxx, we would have agreed that hubby [Venoym] was unquestionably the main tank. But we maintain our toons so evenly that neither is “better” geared. And again, we both excel at different fights. Venoym also has at least a year on me in tanking experience. It honestly depends on the fight regarding who is actually the main tank… some fights a block tank is more of an advantage in a certain role – whether that be “main” tanking or “off” tanking.

I’m not saying we’re the best – by any stretch of the imagination. But we ARE good. We ARE solid. We’re good alone and even better together.

On another note – Please feel free to check out my husband Venoym’s blog – Holy Necromancy. His updates will probably be much more spaced out than mine as he’s not a big blogger but I’m trying to get him to blog more frequently.

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42020 / 50000 words. 84% done!

Well… I’m in the home stretch of NaNo.  The story has come to me faster than I could have dreamed – I wrote my daily goal today in about 45 minutes and I even wrote extra.  I’m still aiming for the 1667 daily target [I like that blue bar to be full] and I’ve met it all but a 2-3 days.  I’ve even exceeded it significantly a couple times.  Each night instead of just laying awake trying to go to sleep, I’ve been plotting out some of the next day’s story [and I usually fall asleep before I’m done].  So eh :)  I’m actually enjoying it quite a bit and it’s not taking over my life.

This progress was probably helped along by the fact that our guild took a couple weeks break from raiding [we’re now back and working on Raggy again… just a hair from phase 3].

The lock I’m leveling with Endyme’s baby priest hit level 60 last night.  The undead hunter I worked on a bit during the 2 week break is level 50 [heirlooms and guild xp really is sick].  Askevar [my main] got the 378 tanking boots crafted the other day.  Hubby should be getting them tomorrow with luck.

So it’s actually been a quiet month.

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As a former GM and a former and current Raid Leader, I’m going to let you all in on a small dirty little secret.  Retro runs are more than just “fun times” for people in those positions.  And if you’re new to a guild, it’s in your best interests to go to a few and to take it somewhat seriously.

For many GMs and Raid leaders, it’s a chance to see how new people perform.  While a certain amount of goofing off is expected [and even encouraged], things that you do can get you a progression raid spot, or cost you one.  Over the years of my experience I’ve seen a lot of things in these runs and I’ve watched people cross themselves off the list of folks I would call on for a progression run.  I’ve also seen people impress me so much that I pursued them for a spot in my raid.

Now I’m not saying it’s the end all/be all, or that one true mistake will cost you.  But there are some things you just DON’T do.

1. Wiping a raid on purpose “for fun”.  No one cares for a wipe.  Wipes can still happen in old content if you have too few people, if people are careless, or if people don’t know some of the fights [hard modes in particular].  But doing it on purpose?  Likely not going to score you an invite to the progression run.

2. Refusing to listen to the raid leader.  Yes, these runs are often LOLfaceroll, but listening to and respecting the authority of the person in charge of the raid is something you should do.  Deciding you don’t have to follow what they’re wanting you to do just because you want to be stubborn?  Not good.  Intentionally messing up an achievement because you take the notion to disobey the raid leader?  Not a good impression.

3. Standing in Bad/Refusing to Obey Mechanics – This is what I always looked for most.  The first two items are automatic red flags, but this one was also quite important.  If you’re dying to “bad stuff” in old content, what’s that going to spell for your ability to avoid it in an actual stressful situation [ie progression]?  If you’re the one standing in every defile/etc or getting a debuff on you and killing half the raid time after time – outlook: not good.  Telling the raid leader that you can stand in [insert bad here] because this is lolfaceroll shows not only a lack of respect for the raid leader but for the raid in general – and your healers specifically.  Making mistakes in this category happen but I’d venture that most raid leaders and GMs are saavy enough to know the difference most of the time.

4. How you react when you make a mistake and do wipe the raid/kill people [we all do it at one point or another].  Seeing someone say “I’m sorry about that, won’t happen again” makes me happy.  You know X was a problem and you’re taking responsibility for it and are going to correct it.  Then just do.  You’d be amazed how that kind of attitude will stick with a raid leader.

4. General Obnoxiousness.  Enough said I suppose.  Having fun is one thing.  Being obnoxious is something else.

Raid leaders and GMs are watching and it’s not a bad thing either.  They’re watching where you fall generally on the dps meter [on retro runs your numerical dps really doesn’t matter but they’ll watch where you are relative to current raiders particularly on boss fights] as well as how you move out of bad.  They’ll be looking at what spells you use as a healer and how your threat is and how hardy you are as a tank.

For me, new people get slotted into about 5 categories in terms of progression – 1. Ready to Raid; 2. Has Potential/Almost There; 3. Major Work Needed/Red Flags Sent Up; 4. Undecided/Unknown; 5. Heck No.  No, not all of them are interested in raiding and it may not be the most fair thing to view things through these lenses but a few retro runs will definitely leave an impression.  What impression do you want to leave?

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